EQUALITY: ETHICS and the LAW

Equality: Ethics and the Law

truth

…What it’s all about

Our laws are supposed to advocate justice, and perhaps they do.  But examine the word just.  It implies honest, moral, fair and impartial, among other things, and while the law proclaims these virtues, it cannot always employ them. What positive law does is to ensure due process.  This means only that it must follow the rule of law, its own law, which may be whatever the society that makes it, wishes.  The law must make concessions in order to accomplish what it claims to seek—”the greatest good for the greatest number.” The law must judge.

The foregoing illustrates both the law’s ambiguity and its ethical status.  The law operates on legal, not ethical, principle.  This probably is as it should be.  After all, we can’t always operate on the

ETHICS ISSUES: ETHICAL GUIDELINES

ETHICAL ISSUES: ETHICAL GUIDELINES

How are you fixed for ethics? Integrity, principle, probity, honesty: concepts that often are overlooked, taken for granted or disregarded in today’s hectic world. ‘Business ethics’ simply isn’t; It deals with values and morals—the way we think things are—and tends to be arbitrary. The real ETHICS we’re talking about is more fundamental and powerful than either business or even legal ethics. This, the real ethics, represents the way things should be.

Ethics. What is it? Well, it’s not the plural of ethic nor is it difficult to define. Think of ethics as truth, and morality as applied truth, better known as honesty.

Can you see how this differs from business ‘ethics?’ Ethics is not debatable. It doesn’t vary with the situation. Nor does it vary with the law. The law is a product of society and can be changed in accordance with society’s wishes. Ethics

LEGAL ETHICS: THE POWER OF THE PEOPLE

LEGAL ETHICS: The Power of the People Over Government

EthicsbooksYou want power?  You’ve got  power: The power to overrule the judge’s verdict in a jury trial. This is power over government, and it’s yours by way of the Constitution. www.fija.org

Our law is ultimately enforced by the people.  That’s you.  And me.  The Constitution says so.  Have you read it?

Juries have the Constitutional right to judge both fact and law. You may believe the law to be unjust and, if you do, you (as a member of a jury) may vote to acquit, even if the accused is guilty of the crime. Or you may believe the law to have been unjustly applied.  In effect and in fact, the law is ultimately enforced by the people, not by government.  That’s you.  And me.

Juries are an effective 

TRUTH – an ETHICAL ISSUE

Living with the truth is, in fact, what EXTREME ETHICS is all about.

John Ransom in a recent column: “Today all you have to do is repeat a thing often enough and it becomes truth. …(P)eople can no longer recognize even their own lies. They can’t distinguish between what is true and the fantasy that exists only in their imagination.  And…there’s only one word you can use to describe it: psychosis.”  Strong words, remarkably well-put and worthy of our attention.  But wait…  Is it the TRUTH?

truth

…What it’s all about

 

Well, before we can deal with that question it’s necessary to come to terms with truth. 

Truth is, simply, what is, tangible and verified or verifiable, real and actual, that exists.  It is a noun and only a noun, one and the same as reality and fact; it

ETHICS, LAW, and THE RULES of LAWYERS

ETHICAL ISSUES:  THE LAW

The rule of law is the most significant issue facing our civilization, an insidious deterioration of the principles on which the republic is built.”  So said Robert Bartley in The Wall Street Journal of September 19, 2000.  He was right then, and he’s right now.

In the eight centuries since the Magna Carta, we have increasingly taken the rule of law for granted, not to mention bending, folding, spindling and otherwise mutilating it along the way.  Our law has been molded by hundreds of years of subjective experience, shaping our behavior to the point where its beginnings are lost in clouds of uncertainty.  Further, this vast accumulation of experience encourages us to selectively pick only those pieces that seem to justify our need at any given moment.  This is fodder for lawyers, whose job it is to sort through the plethora of records and determine a course of action for any given situation.  Somebody has to do it.

ETHICAL ISSUES: SOCIETY

THE ETHICS of SOCIETY  II

Alexander Hamilton wrote (1775): “The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for, among old parchments, or musty records. They are written, as with a sun beam, in the whole volume of human nature…and can never be erased or obscured by mortal power.”

continued from a previous post, as promised:   In addition to any powers granted the individual by civil law, the individual retains certain powers granted by virtue of his humanity and natural law.  When there’s a conflict, he must look beyond his privileges (granted by the group) to his rights (granted by his very being), and he is not only empowered but obligated to resolve the conflict in the interest of mankind, not the State.  If the conflict involves ethics, there is no contest.  Ethics is the only choice.

The ‘global community’ aspired to