ETHICS 102 – The WHY of Ethics

ETHICS IS: The sum of all fundamentals affecting right conduct in every case at all times.  

truth

…What it’s all about

Ethicsa universal personal attribute, defines what is right, good and true.  It requires nothing other than yourself to approve or apply.  It’s an integral part of you that applies to the whole of humanity—in fact to Earth and the entire Universe—not just to you or any particular group.

Ethics, founded in truth, a First Principle, is also right and good.  And this is where the whole of humanity comes in because while truth is a given, good and right are not; therefore, the terms require clarification. 

But first, to put ethics in perspective, it is first necessary to define its foundation, TRUTH.  But therein lies a problem:  Fundamentals (like truth) cannot be perfectly defined. They must remain at

THE ETHICS OF ACCEPTANCE: BELIEF

THE ETHICS OF ACCEPTANCE:  BELIEF, TRUST and FAITH

There’s an old story about Amos at his baptism.  After the first submersion he surfaces shouting, “I believe!  I believe!”  Coming up after the second dunking he sputters again, “I believe!  I believe!”  After the final immersion he’s asked:  “Just what do you believe, Amos?”   Amos:  “I believe you’re tryin’ to drown me!”

We all believe—have beliefs—call it trust or even faith.  You trust that you’ll be alive in the next instant, otherwise why bother surviving this one? The fact is that you believe it.  You go to sleep fully expecting–trusting–that you’ll wake up alive.  That takes faith.  If you thought you’d die during the night you probably wouldn’t be so ready to fall asleep.

But just what do you believe?  Well, you may as well believe

ETHICS ISSUES: RISK MANAGEMENT

ETHICS and RISK MANAGEMENT:  Truth, Trust and Honesty

Risk management is like walking a tightrope.  You can play it safe by walking the low rope.  Or you can walk the high rope with more risk of damage but a chance at bigger gains.  Nobody ever said that walking a tightrope, or making decisions, was easy.

Risk is real, and taking risk is a fact of life.  But taking foolish risks is, in a word, senseless.

An awful lot of risk is being sold by an awful lot of ethicists(?) these days.  Some of them, at very prestigious institutes of higher learning, are teaching their students that it’s OK to lie.  And/or cheat.  Don’t believe it?  Check out www.extremeethics.org/business-ethics.  An example from an issue of the Harvard Business Review:  “There is no compelling economic reason to tell the truth

ETHICS ISSUES: POLITICS and POLITICAL ETHICS

ETHICS, POLITICS, and TRUTH

After 2500 years politics is still in need of virtuous men.  From Plato to The Enlightenment, ethics (originally conceived in the political sense) was correctly identified with virtue. It seems that Plato (and Aristotle) had issues with politicians even then.  Things haven’t changed much in the ensuing years.  The aforementioned ‘enlightened’ have slowly eroded the original idea of virtue to the point where tradition itself was thrown under the bus and the very idea of ethics became increasingly incoherent.  Today, a ‘nice’ person with ‘good intentions’ may believe himself ethical.  Know this: Making it easier to be ethical by changing the definition of ethics is fraudulent and unethical in itself.

Since the beginning, truth remains the root of ethics.  ‘Good intentions’ do not necessarily lead to ethical decisions. Ethics is not about feeling or even doing—it’s about being,

ETHICS ISSUES: TRUST

TRUST and the ETHICAL NORM

Whom do you trust?  Your neighbor, your mechanic, your doctor, your attorney, your hairdresser?  Maybe government?  Politicians?  The media?  How about yourself?  Think about it.  And think about lying. Can you trust politicians who say one thing and do another (a government that lies)?  Or those who promise one thing yet do another—in other words, out-and-out lie to you?  Or media that slant their message in favor of their agenda, report only one side of the story, ignore important news that ought to be reported, and yes—outright lie both in print and to your face on television?  If you need examples of these (bipartisan) failings, you’re seriously out of touch—they happen every day, over and over again, in plain sight, and you know it. Lying is rampant to the point